Trigg bushland tuart friends
Wildlife...
Tawny Frogmouth, Podargus strigoides
Tawny frogmouth successfully
returned to Trigg Bushland after
being hit by a car

Trigg Bushland is an important breeding and feeding area for a variety of birds, reptiles, insects and spiders. Bats still occur, but other mammals have largely disappeared.

Sixty-five species of bird have been recorded. Some of the birds that live and breed in the bushland can also be seen foraging in surrounding suburban gardens. Others, such as the bronzewing pigeon and the white-winged fairy-wren, are found only in the bushland.

Birds likely to be seen include the white-cheeked honeyeater, Australian raven, magpie, ring-necked parrot, brown honeyeater, singing honeyeater, red wattlebird, and grey butcherbird. You may also see a black-shouldered kite or Australian kestrel hovering overhead. Harder to see are the small but colourful pardalotes, the white-browed scrubwren (rare in urban Perth ), the varied sittella (often seen walking head-first down tree-trunks), the rufous whistler, and grey fantail.

Pie Dish Beetle Phylis Robertson
Pie dish beetle - PHOTOS PHYLIS ROBERTSON

The area is rich in reptiles. These include snakes, skinks, legless lizards, geckoes and dragon lizards.

In 2011 and again in 2012 there were unconfirmed sightings of an echidna in Trigg Bushland. There have also been regular sightings of quenda diggings. Echidnas and quendas are occasionally found in larger bushland areas, such as Whiteman Park, and any sighting in Trigg Bushland should be immediately reported to the Friends or City of Stirling. Please also take a photo, showing local landmarks, and keep a record of the area where sighted.

Feral animals, including rabbits, foxes and domestic cats and dogs, damage the reserve by eating young seedlings and regrowth, by preying on native species and encouraging weed growth where faeces is deposited. It would be preferable if rabbits and foxes could be eradicated, and domestic animals kept in accordance with guidelines set by the City of Stirling. The City of Stirling has prohibited cats in Trigg Bushland and a fine of $500 or euthanisation of the animal may apply. Additionally, any property within 200 meters of Trigg Bushland is in a 'fauna protection zone' and a special license is required to have more than one cat as a pet within this zone. Please see the City of Stirling website for details.

Download the Trigg Bushland Bird List (this will take you to the Perth Biodiversity Project - the Trigg Bushland bird list is on page 89 of the report entitled 'Bird surveys in selected metropolitan reserves - Round 3 survey report"). To see which bird has been eating marri nuts, see Cockatoo Care's chart here.

For assistance with injured animals contact the Wildcare Helpline on (08) 9474 9055 (24hrs) or see the Dept of Environment and Conservation's Wildcare page.

New! Fauna Survey Details for 2015 !

Results from fauna trapping by DPaW Research Scientist Mark Cowan as provided to the City of Stirling:

Presence between 1994 and 1997 at Trigg Dune sites
Species Common name External link
Aprasia repens Sand plain worm-lizard Photo link
Cryptoblepharis buccanani Buchanan's snake-eyed skink Photo link
Ctenotus fallens West-coast laterite ctenotus Photo link
Ctenotus australis Western limestone ctenotus Photo link
Cyclodomorphus celatus Western slender blue-tongue Photo link
Strophurus spinigerus Soft spiny-tailed gecko Photo link
Hemiergis quadrilineata Two-toed earless skink Photo link
Lerista elegans Elegant slider Photo link
Lerista lineopunctulata Dotted-line robust slider Photo link
Lerista praepedita Blunt-tailed west-coast slider Photo link
Lialis burtonis Burton's legless lizard Photo link
Menetia greyi Common dwarf skink Photo link
Morethia obscura Shrubland morethia skink Photo link
Mus musculus House mouse Photo link
Myobatrachus gouldi Turtle frog Photo link
Christinus marmoratus Marbled gecko Photo link
Pogona minor Dwarf bearded dragon Photo link
Pseudonaja affinis Dugite Photo link
Ramphotyphlops australis Southern blind snake Photo link
Tiliqua occipitalis Western blue-tongued skink Photo link
Tiliqua rugosa Shingleback Photo link
Ctenophorus adelaidensis Western heath dragon Photo link
Simoselaps bertholdi Jan's banded snake Photo link
Neelaps calonotus Black-striped snake Photo link
Brachyurophis semifasciata Southern shovel-nosed snake Photo link

 

Presence summer/autumn 2013
Species Common name External link
Aprasia repens Sand plain worm-lizard See above
Christinus marmoratus Marbled gecko See above
Ctenotus fallens West-coast laterite ctenotus See above
Cyclodomorphus celatus Western slender blue-tongue See above
Echiopsis curta Burdick Photo link
Hemiergis quadrilineata Two-toed earless skink See above
Lerista elegans Elegant slider See above
Lerista lineopunctulata Dotted-line robust slider See above
Lerista praepedita Blunt-tailed west-coast slider See above
Lialis burtonis Burton's legless lizard See above
Morethia obscura Shrubland morethia skink See above
Mus musculus House mouse See above
Pogona minor Dwarf bearded dragon See above
Pseudonaja affinis Dugite See above
Ramphotyphlops australis Southern blind snake See above
Simoselaps bertholdi Jan's banded snake See above
Strophurus spinigerus Soft spiny-tailed gecko See above
Tiliqua occipitalis Western blue-tongued skink See above
Tiliqua rugosa Shingleback See above

 

Jan's Banded Snake Simoselaps bertholdi

Jan's Banded Snake (Simoselaps bertholdi) found dead on track, run over by a mountain bicycle.

 

 

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Website development funded by a Department of Environment and Conservation Community Grant for Tuart Conservation and Management. Text and images copyright Friends of Trigg Bushland Inc except as otherwise noted. Website design by Nina McLaren and Peter Peacock 2008